Sermons To Go (Page 3)

Have You Heard?

Text    Isaiah 40:21-31

Preached FCCW, February 4, 2018

 

The prophet Isaiah wrote the words of hope that I just read — about God giving power to the faint and strength to the powerless — to a people who were in desperate need of both. It was a time of great trial for the nation of Israel, many of whom were living in exile in Babylon. The things that had happened to them rocked the foundations of their faith in God. They questioned whether their way was hidden from the Lord or if God had disregarded their right. In other words, did God forget about them or had God forsaken them?

More Than Words

Mark 1:21-28

Preached FCCW

January 28, 2018

 

The breaking news coming from the city of Capernaum was that the Jesus train was gathering steam and picking up passengers.

In the short space of just the first half of the opening chapter of his Gospel, Mark traces Jesus’ rise to recognition from an opening endorsement by John the Baptist at the Jordan River, to a grass roots movement of gathering disciples in Galilee, to his breakout preaching engagement in Capernaum.

Net Work

Preached FCCW, January 21, 2018

Text Mark 1:14-20

Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near;repent, and believe in the good news.”

As Jesus passed along the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen.

Following Jesus

Preached FCCW, January 14, 2017

John 1:43-51

How do you define the word “Christian?”

If I asked you to complete this sentence: A Christian is someone who _________,

how would you fill in the blank?

Given the number of people here, I bet we would could come up with a whole gamut of responses before we were through.

Of This Gospel, a Servant Be

Ephesians 3: 1-12     Preached FCCW    January 7, 2018

In the present day city of Jerusalem, stands the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is built on the hill where tradition claims, Jesus was crucified and buried.  Due to the sacredness of its location, possession of the structure has changed hands numerous times through history.

Home for the Holidays

Home for the Holidays
Luke 2:1-7 Preached FCCW, December 24, 2017

We come to the last in this Advent sermon series on Finding Sacred Truths in Secular Christmas Songs.
In case you didn’t recognize that tune, it’s “There’s No Place Like Home for the Holidays.”
Those words capture one of the enduring charms of Christmas time; that sense that there really is “no place like home for the holidays” which compels us, no matter how far away we’ve roamed, to return to our roots to celebrate the season, and to experience that sense of belonging that we all yearn for.

Santa Claus Is Coming to Town

Luke 1:5-7 and Mark 1:1-8

Preached FCCW, December 3, 2017

Friday morning, while posting the daily UCC Devotional to the Church Facebook page, a post in my news feed from the Westminster Police Department caught my eye.

It wasn’t the usual warning about telephone scammers, an Amber Alert or even a traffic advisory.

This post announced that Santa Claus is coming to town.

That’s right! He’s coming here to Westminster!

The announcement listed the times and places where he would be, and detailed instructions to follow if you wanted to meet the jolly old elf in person.

The Covert King

Ephesians 1:15-23 and Matthew 25:31-46

Preached FCCW  November 26, 2017 (Christ the King Sunday)

There is a story that comes to us from out of the 16th century about a great leader of the church by the name of Bishop Hugh Latimer.

One Sunday morning he entered his pulpit and looked out to see King Henry VIII in the congregation.

I’m guessing that Old Henry wasn’t hard to spot out there in the pews.

He might have worn his crown and carried his scepter.

At the very least, he would have been wearing his Sunday best, which is saying something when you’re talking about a King’s wardrobe.

You might think that Bishop Latimer would have been greatly honored at the unexpected presence of his sovereign monarch in his church.

Except that he knew that the sermon he prepared to preach that day would not go well with King Henry.

He thought for a moment and then said to himself, but out loud for all to hear, “Latimer, be careful what you say today; King Henry is here.”

Almost as quickly as Latimer felt the pressure to tailor the sermon he was ready to preach so that it would not offend King Henry, something reminded him of another monarch who was also in attendance.

The Turtle on the Fencepost

Deuteronomy 8:7-18

Preached FCCW November, 19, 2017       Thanksgiving Sunday

Could there ever be a Biblical passage better suited for the Thanksgiving holiday than today’s Old Testament reading from Deuteronomy?

Moses whet the Israelites’ appetite for the Promised Land that awaited them by focusing on the easy access to food they would enjoy there. He portrayed Canaan as a land of olive trees, fruits and honey, and bread without scarcity. Which I think meant the same thing then as it does now – all you can eat. Not exactly turkey with stuffing and cranberry sauce, but certainly a lot better than the diet they had been used to.

The Joshua Generation

Joshua 24:1-3a, 14-25
Preached FCCW, November 12, 2017

The story that the Bible tells often reads like a family tree of faith.
Interspersed throughout the Old Testament and the gospels are genealogies, like mile markers along a road. Those are the passages that never get read in worship, and the ones that we most likely skip over when we read the Bible ourselves.
Why take the time to wade through lists of people who most have never heard of with names that few can pronounce?  What purpose does it serve?

Saints Alive!

Preached FCCW November 5, 2017 All Saints Day

Revelation 7:9-17

 

In Coventry, England there stands a very uniquely modern cathedral.

The massive south wall of that structure is made entirely of glass.

And etched into the glass are the huge figures — four feet wide and ten feet tall — of saints and angels.

By Truth Set Free

Preached October 26, 2017           Reformation Sunday

John 8:31-36

 

Jesus said to some Jews who believed in him, “If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples; and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.”

By his own admission, the people he was talking to believed in him, which probably meant they accepted on an intellectual level that he was the Messiah that the Jewish people had been waiting for. But that did not quite make them disciples. To be truly his disciples, they had to, as he said, continue in his word. That expression, to continue, is related to the word abide, which means to make someplace or something your abode. Your home. It implies permanence and continuation and relationship. To become a disciple of Jesus requires something more than intellectual belief in him. It demands a commitment to a relationship to him that shapes all our other relationships and determines our choices.

The Things That Are God’s

Preached FCCW 10-22-2017

Matthew 22:15-22 and 1 Thessalonians 1:1-10

 

According to the laws of Newtonian physics, no two objects can occupy the same space at the same time.

Which, long before an apple ever dropped on Newton’s head, was already an established fact.

Not based on any Law of physics, but on the Law of simple common sense. The kind of common sense that the Pharisees and Herodians trusted in to rid themselves of Jesus.

God’s Sharecroppers

Matthew 21:33-46
Preached FCCW, October 15, 2017

Like most of you, I’ve been watching the frightening images of the deadly wildfires that are ravaging Northern California.

It’s hard to believe it’s the same place of such serene beauty that Sue and I saw when we vacationed in Napa Valley years ago.

Are We There Yet?

Philippians 3:4b-14 Preached FCCW, October 8, 2017 Are we there yet? Anyone who has traveled with children has heard those words, right? They remind us how anticipation of something good that awaits us down the road can affect the way we feel about the present moment. And, while we may outgrow the impulse to say more »